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Wonderbra 3DD billboard

article 1311856 0B2ACEAF000005DC 113 634x401 Wonderbra 3DD billboard

Wonderbra is causing a stir yet again in the UK, this time with a 3D billboard that builds on the campaign’s origins 16 years ago.

Don’t you hate how often times the most brilliant ideas seem so simple once they are presented to you? Now where are those Avatar glasses?

Full disclosure – my current employer’s UK consumer agency, JCPR, has previously worked for Wonderbra. I am not sure if they are involved in this campaign.

I lifted the image from this DailyMail story.If you enjoyed this post why not subscribe to my blog via RSS or email by following this link. Also whilst you\’re at it why not follow me on Twitter .

Tarp surfing

When I was a kid I surfed every chance I got and still get out regularly now.

Living an hour or so by the bus from the beach though it wasn’t always possible to do the real thing, so me and my mates had to improvise somewhat. We rode our skateboards like surfboards on our driveways; ran up and down the side of storm water drains, pretending we were in the world’s longest barrel; and even lay prone at the bottom of big hills in King Edward Park to see what it would be like to paddle into a 40 foot Waimea Bay monster. We never, ever thought of doing what the cats in this video do though. And more’s the pity – it looks well fun.

Bear with the video until the 30 second mark, that’s where the brilliance begins.

HT Aquabumps for alerting me to the video.If you enjoyed this post why not subscribe to my blog via RSS or email by following this link. Also whilst you\’re at it why not follow me on Twitter .

Why Zippers Have YKK On Them – masamikito's posterous

ykk Why Zippers Have YKK On Them   masamikito's posterous

Today I found out why zippers have a YKK on them.   The YKK stands for Yoshida Kogyo Kabushikikaisha (say that five times fast).  In 1934 Tadao Yoshida founded Yoshida Kogyo Kabushikikaisha (translated Yoshida Industries Limited).  This company is now the worlds foremost zipper manufacturer, making about 90% of all zippers in over 206 facilities in 52 countries.  In fact, they not only make the zippers, they also make the machines that make the zippers; no word on if they make the machines that make the parts that make up the machines that make the zippers.

Their largest factory in Georgia makes over 7 million zippers per day.

In any event, Mr. Yoshida’s company zipped to number one by practicing the “Cycle of Goodness”, as he called it.  Namely, “No one prospers unless he renders benefit to others.”  Using this principle, he endeavored to create the best zippers out there that would hold up over long periods of time in the end product.  This in turn would benefit both the manufacturers who used his zippers and the end customer and because of these things benefit his company with higher repeat and referral sales, thus completing the “Cycle of Goodness” *zen moment*

So next time you’re zipping up, take a moment to remember Mr. Yoshida; also, if you’re going commando, careful with Captain Winky on the zip up.  I can’t stress that enough.

Sources:

 

I have always wondered about this and have many times considered YKK one of my favourite brands for its ubiquity and utter dominance of its market.

Thanks Masami for this! icon smile Why Zippers Have YKK On Them   masamikito's posterous

Posted via web from Matthew Gain’s posterous

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TweetEffect- When did you lose or gain twitter followers?

TweetEffect is a tool that I came across today, when trying to analyse what it is that is working from a client’s Twitter feed and what isn’t.

Being an egotist, I of course had to put my results in and was fascinated at what I saw. Generally there was small movements up and down, but there was a few posts that really seemed to shift my users numbers drastically.

The two posts that added most followers was a tweet that referenced social media, and the Black eyed Peas. Whilst Black eyed Peas are no doubt incredibly popular, I bet it was the social media words that made pricked people’s and perhaps more likely a few bots’ attention.

tweet rank 1 1024x102 TweetEffect  When did you lose or gain twitter followers?

The other post that drove a lot of uplift was one I where I added to the #medievalbumperstickers meme that was going on last week. Though the dramatic drop off a few tweets later suggests this may be that Tiwtter was doing something funky?

tweet rank 3 1024x171 TweetEffect  When did you lose or gain twitter followers?

What was the most damaging? Mentioning HotHouse’s new digital PR man @ScottRhodie

tweet rank 2 1024x112 TweetEffect  When did you lose or gain twitter followers?

Obviously all of this needs to be taken with a grain of salt, but interesting regardless.If you enjoyed this post why not subscribe to my blog via RSS or email by following this link. Also whilst you\’re at it why not follow me on Twitter .

BBC – dot.life: A week with Windows

In computing terms, I live a double life. At work, I use our corporate IT system which runs on Windows XP; at home, I’m a Mac user and have grown accustomed to the Apple environment. But for the last week, I’ve been living in a Windows world, preparing for the launch of Microsoft’s latest operating system.

I borrowed a small, very expensive Sony Vaio X running Windows 7 – the lightest laptop I’ve ever used – and tried to do as much of my work as possible using the unfamiliar operating system. I didn’t carry out the kind of tests you might find in a grown-up review but then most of us don’t do that – we just try to get on with new software and only really notice it when it goes wrong.

rory windows595 BBC   dot.life: A week with Windows

If you’re used to one operating system, trying another is like moving into a strange house – it may all look very nice, but it’s a pain trying to find out how to turn up the central heating or where the glasses are stored. But Windows 7 did at least boot up reasonably fast – Microsoft says it’s reduced the “footprint” of the system by 50%, and that’s made it more efficient.

The first thing I want to do when I switch on is connect to the internet. I’m used to searching out a wireless signal at the top of a Mac screen but I found, without too much trouble, a similar connection area to the right of the Windows taskbar and was quickly online.

The Start button in the bottom left-hand corner still provides the route to the applications, though the taskbar has become a little like Apple’s dock, so you can simply drag frequently-used applications onto it.

I set about opening a browser, e-mail and word processing applications, and tried to work out where I would keep my photos and music. That process somehow feels more integrated on a Mac because of the iLife suite that comes with it. But having dragged a few tracks and pictures off my home network into the Vaio, it was reasonably easy to start playing.

But what’s really different about using this operating system? The two things that stood out for me were the ability to hover over open items in the taskbar and see what was happening at a glance – and a function which allows you to snap two open windows alongside each other so that you can compare or maybe transfer information between them.

But here’s a funny thing. By the end of the week, I looked at what I was doing on the tiny screen – and found that just about everything involved software not made by Microsoft. So I’d installed the Firefox browser in preference to Internet Explorer, and started writing documents using Google Docs rather than Microsoft Word, and checking my e-mail via Gmail. As for music, I’d installed iTunes, and to feed my social networking needs, I placed Tweetdeck on the taskbar.

I had ended up furnishing my new Windows 7 home with some familiar items from elsewhere – so perhaps the operating system matters less than it once did.

Of course, what is really important to Microsoft is not winning over the minority who use Mac OS X or Linux variants, but reconnecting with the many previously loyal customers who were deeply unimpressed by Vista.

This week at the National Museum of Computing at Bletchley Park, I met Tony Sale, who has spent 15 years working to rebuild Colossus, the world’s first programmable computer used to crack German codes in World War II. At home, Tony has used every version of Windows since 3.1*, but he’s stopped at XP. What was wrong with Vista?

“It tried to tell me how to organise my files all the time, I didn’t like that.” By contrast, Tony says he finds XP very stable and very usable – and he’s going to have to be sure that Windows 7 does a similar, or better, job before upgrading.

Computing has come a long way since Colossus, but Microsoft’s customers will be asking the same question about its new operating system as the code-breakers did about their new-fangled toy. Does it do the same job better and faster than what we use now?

* As some commenters have pointed out, what Tony Sale must have started with was Windows 3.1, not 3.2 as I had previously written.

My favourite part of this review by Rory Cellan-Jones is this:

I didn’t carry out the kind of tests you might find in a grown-up review but then most of us don’t do that – we just try to get on with new software and only really notice it when it goes wrong.

He is so right. Most people use a fraction of the potential of a software service. A much more realistic way to review a service.

Posted via web from Matthew Gain’s posterous

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The Power of Google Insights – via Mark Pollard

media httpwwwmarkpollardnetwpcontentuploads200910NameItjpg ncipsDkJfcGiJhJ.jpg.scaled500 The Power of Google Insights   via Mark Pollard

A very interesting post here from MRM Strategy expert Mark Pollard on the importance of Google insights for planning and measuring brand health and campaign success.

Given the wealth of information available by employing free, or near free measurement tools nowadays I am glad I am not in the research business.

Posted via web from Matthew’s posterous

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The PR Warrior: Playboy Magazine Parlays Marge Simpson into Publicity Gold

media httpprwarriortypepadcoma6a00df35215aa888330120a62a5349970c800wi wnqmwtmCEvfrkod.a6a00df35215aa888330120a62a5349970c 800wi.scaled500 The PR Warrior: Playboy Magazine Parlays Marge Simpson into Publicity Gold

An interesting post here from the awfully clever Trevor Young. Whilst I don’t think this will arrest the long term circulation of Playboy it sure has garnered a lot of short term awareness.

Whilst I agree with Trevor’s sentiment generally I don’t necessarily think this is a risk for Playboy. This issue will undoubtedly be a hit on the newsagent racks and will appeal well beyond its fan base. Not that I think PR people shouldn’t be taking risks mind.

Posted via web from Matthew’s posterous

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Skittles takes down it website

As of last night www.skittles.com is no longer a site controlled by Mars, Skittles manufacturer, but is populated by content generated by the web community.

The Home Page is populated by the results of a search via Twitter for ‘Skittles’, the Products page provides a link to Wikipedia, The Friends page to the Skittles Facebook Fan Page.

The reason why I like this so much is that it reminds the people behind this brand to constantly think about their customers and consumers generally. If the public doesn’t like something Skittles does, it will be right there on its home page for all to see. Of course as the power of the consumer has risen, any mistake was fairly readily accessible for all to see anyways, but I believe this move to relinquish control to the consumer completely will further drive a consumer centred mindset at Mars.

image thumb Skittles takes down it website

There is a bit of PR stunt feeling about this, but I like it. It will be interesting to see how the people at Mars use the site to tap the insight of the crowd and shape the brand into the future.If you enjoyed this post why not subscribe to my blog via RSS or email by following this link. Also whilst you\’re at it why not follow me on Twitter .

Should Facebook stop breaking hearts?

As Facebook turns five, should it consider its practice of breaking hearts?

A couple of weeks ago the newspaper headlines declared “Chelsy Davy let the world know that she had broken up with Prince Harry using a thoroughly modern tool: her ‘relationship status’ on social networking site, Facebook.” And in last Sundays Observer, there was a full page story on the very same topic. The author of the Observer article, Georgina Hobbs-Meyes, a 24 year old who has just broken up with her Facebook cheating husband, laments, “once you announce you announce your relationship on Facebook…your love life is on show to all.” Hobbs-Meyer goes on to state that rather than change her relationship status she has opted instead to simply delete it and avoid the “cascade of news through friends’ newsfeeds.”

It was this very cascade of unwanted news and attention that I discussed with George Hopkin and Christian Payne at a recent Social Media Breakfast. When we were chatting, Christian described the flood of consoling messages he received when he changed his relationship status from married to single. The thing is Christian wasn’t breaking up, his wife simply didn’t want to be linked to from his Facebook page, but there was no option to avoid the news cascade.

This is something I have thought about a few times. The smart people at Facebook could come up with a way to change your status without announcing it to your Facebook news feed, so why haven’t they? My theory is that news items announcing relationship changes generate a very high rate of comments, private messages and general page views. All of these mean more time on the Facebook network, which is good news for those trying to sell ads for Facebook (full disclosure – my employer Microsoft is one of the companies that sells ads for Facebook). Is this another case of Facebook putting ad sales ahead of the desires of its users?

Image stolen from here.

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My three favourite Super Bowl ads

The biggest day on the North American advertising calendar The Super Bowl happened last night our time.

What with credit crunch and all there was a lot of reports in the media about how the big car brands were going to be absent this year and how not all the slots were selling at the premium rates. In the end there was still a lot of new creatives that were rolled out. To see the full list of ads that aired visit the Ad Age dedicated page.

I have embedded my favourite three ads below for your viewing pleasure.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hr-wISyGSW0&hl=en&fs=1]

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K_Fwryx85tM&hl=en&fs=1]
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bbLtLUwMTxg&hl=en&fs=1]

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